WTP

The Woven Tale Press, the Web’s premier online literary and fine art magazine, is also a hub for writing and visual arts, bringing together notable artists and writers seeking to share their work more broadly with communities actively in quest of unique voices and compelling perspectives.

A Contemporary Spin on the Traditional

Ruth Bunnewell’s landscape painting is regarded as “putting a contemporary spin on traditional British landscape painting.”

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There’s Nothing like The Nothing That Is

Johanna Skibsrud records ten years of thoughts about the concept of “nothing” in her new book of eleven essays.

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A Novel as Riddle

WTP guest writer Lisa Zeiger reviews SLEEPLESS NIGHT By Margriet de Moor, “a novel for the floating world we live in now.”

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Grief First Experienced

Kayla Lutes’s short story “Lilacs in Memoriam” appears in November’s Woven Tale Press Vol. VII #9

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3D Printed Sculpture

Heather Gorham is both a painter and sculptor working in traditional media, such as acrylic, bronze, and wood, with a more recent focus on digital sculptural technology and 3D printing to add to her bag of tricks.

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A Painter Making Sculpture

Heather Gorham’s figurative artwork revolves around the tangible interpretation of the everyday in which she creates—with a twist—a dreamy window into common experiences.

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Our Cornerstone: The Woven Tale Press Magazine

A Premier Literary and Fine Art Publication Highlighting Stellar Writing and Visual arts

 What’s Central to WTP Besides our Magazine:


Our Latest

Eye on the Indies

Book Review

A Novel as Riddle

WTP guest writer Lisa Zeiger reviews SLEEPLESS NIGHT By Margriet de Moor, "a novel for the floating world we live in now."

A Woven Tale Press Voice & Vision

Our WTP Voice & Visions are collaborations where the literary meets the visual arts. We do our best to pair our writers with our artists who have appeared in The Woven Tale Press magazine, but readings of works may also be paired with alternative visuals compiled by our most talented video producer Heidi Stauff.

Story by Richard Dokey

Dokey is the author of August Heat, (Story Press), and Pale Morning Dun, (University of Missouri Press) which was nominated for the American Book Award. His most recent collection of stories is Fly Fishing the River Styx (Adelaide Books).

See his work in Vol. VII #8

Featured

painting by Amy Bennett

By Eileen Murphy

Hillsdale Kitchen
oil on panel
24” x 30′′

See her work in this month’s issue of The Woven Tale Press  Magazine

 


Testimonials

“The Woven Tale Press is quickly becoming a mecca for writers and artists and those who understand the essential middle ground between the two.”

Beth Kephart, author of Tell The Truth. Make it Matter.

“Even more compelling than its gorgeous layout and sumptuous production quality, is the editorial aesthetic of The Woven Tale Press. Brilliant visual and literary art is presented with exquisite sensitivity. These pages are saturated with color and filled with intoxicating stories and poems. The Woven Tale Press offers genuine art: original, provocative, raw.

Sari Friedman, author

“I love The Woven Tale Press. It’s a neat little journal curating the best of contemporary art and literature.”

— Claire Meadows, poet and Editor-in-Chief/Founder of After Nyne Magazine


“Discovering The Woven Tale Press was like finding a sparkling gem in the ‘cybershere sandbox.’ It’s presentation of visual and literary arts is a treasure trove of creativity.  It is such a wonderful opportunity for those of us looking to join the creative conversation, and to learn from others.”

Carolyn Land, multi-medium artist

“You know that bad feeling you have when you think of all of the great art and writing that are bypassing your attention, escaping your notice?  Now we have The Woven Tale Press, one last Hail Mary Pass to catch, one last chance to get the best of what’s about to be missed, and I’m grateful.”

Beth Ann Fennelly, Mississippi Poet Laureate

“What strikes me about The Woven Tale Press is the way themes appear in each issue, without ever being named. The editors are clever and subtle with their juxtapositions of written and visual imagery, so that you have no choice but to make new connections between the works.”

Paula Goldman, photographer