Decayed Textural Layers and Subtle Colors

Decayed Textural Layers and Subtle Colors

Enjoy our WTP Spotlights, notable selections featuring artists and writers from our Woven Tale Press magazine. To read the issue in full subscribe and you can also register on our site to enjoy our archive. Chao Ding is a Beijing native perceptual painter, having learned classical painting from his father as a child. He originally studied Fashion Design and…

A Game of &s

A Game of &s

Enjoy our WTP Spotlights, notable selections featuring artists and writers from our Woven Tale Press magazine. To read the issue in full subscribe and you can also register on our site to enjoy our archive. Elizabeth Kirkpatrick-Vrenios lives in Mendocino, California. Twice nominated for a Pushcart Prize, her poetry has been featured in venues including The Ekphrastic Review, Abyss…

Merging the Outdoors and Creative Expression

Merging the Outdoors and Creative Expression

Coralie Huon is a multidisciplinary artist and illustrator who takes inspiration from nature and landscapes. Huon, who lives and works in Grenoble, France, uses landscapes as metaphors to express emotional and spiritual journeys. She highlights the beauty of the outdoor world and the interaction of people with these places and themselves. She spent a decade studying and working as an…

On Viruses and Angels

On Viruses and Angels

Enjoy our WTP Spotlights, notable selections featuring artists and writers from our Woven Tale Press magazine. To read the issue in full subscribe and you can also register on our site to enjoy our archive. Richard Hoffman has published four volumes of poetry, Without Paradise; Gold Star Road; Emblem; and Noon until Night. His other books include the memoirs…

Guiding Your Reader’s Eye: The Choreography of Perception, Part Two

Guiding Your Reader’s Eye: The Choreography of Perception, Part Two

 Doing More with Less By WTP Writer Richard Wertime Woven Tale Press writer Richard Wertime reflects on the craft of fiction in an ongoing series of craft notes Read Part One here ~ When we’re writing synoptically—“sketchily,” that is—and wish to move on to parts of a story we intend to treat more fully, we…