On Writing

Writing: How to Get Story Ideas…

By J.R. Frontera of http://jrfrontera.wordpress.com …otherwise known as: How To Tap Into the Elusive “Everywhere.” If you are like most yet-to-be-published writers, you attempt to learn all you can from the successful career authors any chance you get. This often includes reading magazine articles, interviews, and online articles about them, and sometimes even traveling to
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The Nine Commandments of Indie Writing

As a published Indie Writer, I attest to the hard work it takes to complete a manuscript. Family and friends’ “this is good” critiques do not good writers make, neither does moaning about the absence of the muse, or other responsibilities that may take writers away from writing. The successful Indie Writer: sets and respects stated/written goals
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The Four D’s: Part 3 – Depth of Character

A Special Feature Series: See Part 1 and Part 2. Writing craft books and writing teachers will tell you that readers read for character. Indeed, the cornerstone of literary fiction is the complex character study. At a minimum, even the most surface-dwelling, plot-driven genre novel needs engaging characters to carry the story. These characters are
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Organizing the Memoir

By Lee Martin of http://leemartinauthor.com Were you feeling a little disorganized around the holidays? Imagine the way writers of memoirs must feel when faced with the task of giving shape and structure to the experiences that they’re trying to render on the page. I’ve had a request to talk about such things, so here goes. When writing
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Words That Don’t Exist

DeWitt Henry on the challenge of balancing author tone with character tone, and the difficulties that arise as far down as word choice.

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Stuck? Try Writing Poetry

It’s been a while since I’ve posted any new writing. There is a reason for that: busy, busy, busy relaunching my first book under my own name, busy revising the sequel so it might be ready in the new year, and well, Life keeps happening. And another thing: being in this writing group of mine has really
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The Story Teller and the Telling

“For my ninth birthday I received my first diary. The first words I wrote: ‘I want to be a writer.’ This was the first time I articulated what I must have always known. It was always about words—and story—for me.”

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Part I: The Department of Redundancy Department

I’d like to call your attention to an editing tool for the editing of redundant words and redundant word phrases that turn up in rough drafts and not-so-rough drafts (what?).  Why is this important? First, good writing is concise. Thomas Jefferson said, “The most valuable of all talents is that of never using two words when one will do.” When someone writes past experience, fatally killed, foreign
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Writers’ Advice, Tips, and Theories

Here is a list of essays, articles, quotes, and links on writing advice, tips, theory, and thought. (From 23 Tips from Famous Writers) “Let the writer take up surgery or bricklaying if he is interested in technique. There is no mechanical way to get the writing done, no shortcut. The young writer would be a
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A Lesson in Odes

by Laura Shovan [dropcap]O[/dropcap]des are all about tone. Show enough enthusiasm for even a simple object like a shoe, and a poet can convince the reader of the object’s value, that it’s worthy of attention. That is what Chilean poet Pablo Neruda did with his Odes to Common Things, a book which still influences poets
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On Aphorisms

A selection by DeWitt Henry of thirty paragraphs on writing, the writer's life, and aphorisms themselves from Richard Kostalanetz’s A WRITER'S TORAH.

Adverbicide

WTP guest writer Ann Epstein defends the often disparaged adverb, and in the process explores why writers in particular are susceptible to arbitrary rules of style.

Reflections by Tillie Olsen

"What matters to me is the kind of soil in which people have, out of which they have to grow, and the kind of climate around them." Prose editor DeWitt Henry shares his highlights from a transcribed recording of Tillie Olsen's reading at Emerson College in 1974.

The Story Teller and the Telling

"For my ninth birthday I received my first diary. The first words I wrote: 'I want to be a writer.' This was the first time I articulated what I must have always known. It was always about words—and story—for me."

The Minefield and the Soul

"I do believe an author’s biographical identity is an insufficient marker for experience—even impossible to pin down with any accuracy—and the same holds true for a reader’s. This is the beginning of compassion for others."

On Fact and Fiction

"We don’t have to bullfight to write believably about bullfighting, or love, or crime, or suicide." DeWitt Henry on the lines writers blur between fact and fiction.

Clean

Beth Kephart learns "the liability of having, the politics of possession, the sound of time crashing time, the ache of what is loved and what will be lost."

Words That Don’t Exist

DeWitt Henry on the challenge of balancing author tone with character tone, and the difficulties that arise as far down as word choice.