On Writing

Yossi Waxman | Novel Excerpt

Read an excerpt from Yossi Waxman’s novel, Ev’ry Time We Say Goodbye I Die a Little, illustrated by acrylic paintings by the author, a professional artist from Israel.

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“If it Sounds Like Writing, Rewrite it”

Carol Cassara of http://carolcassara.com “Worship of Writers”: a phrase on wrapping paper I saw while in London, and one I think is what authors finally are, collectively.  I wasn’t sure how I would use the photo I took of this wrapping paper: Wrapping paper I saw in London Then I ran across some of the very best writing tips ever.
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Dear Creative-Writing Class

To all of you who may have taken creative writing classes: What kind of letter might you right to your classmates? newyorker.com
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Reflections by Tillie Olsen

“What matters to me is the kind of soil in which people have, out of which they have to grow, and the kind of climate around them.” Prose editor DeWitt Henry shares his highlights from a transcribed recording of Tillie Olsen’s reading at Emerson College in 1974.

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Marvel Comics and Film Noir – What They Taught Me About Writing

I knew early what I didn’t want to read. Though I longed for adventure my mother bought me all the usual little girl comics/magazines containing stories about ballerinas in pink tutus, owning a pony, or cute puppies and donkeys. Even at such a tender age I didn’t care for them. I’d rather be out climbing
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Fiction Writing: Subtext, the Story Within the Story

Something that is often missing in stories, particularly short stories and flash fiction, is subtext. A quick search on subtext revealed a lot of posts on dialog and setting and how to use them to imply what is not expressly written. For this post, I’m taking it a little larger in the sense of looking
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Old Photographs and Memoir

By Lee Martin of http://leemartinauthor.com I remember on New Year’s Eve, when I was a boy, my father’s side of the family would gather for a supper of oyster soup and games of cards—usually either Pitch or Rook. This was in a day when we didn’t have cell phones that took pictures, when we didn’t
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Retreat West

Creating the Writing Retreat I Wanted


by Amanda Saint


Amanda Saint writes about Retreat West— how she founded it and how this writing retreat grew into the hub of a creative community. On The Woven Tale Press!

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A Lesson in Odes

by Laura Shovan [dropcap]O[/dropcap]des are all about tone. Show enough enthusiasm for even a simple object like a shoe, and a poet can convince the reader of the object’s value, that it’s worthy of attention. That is what Chilean poet Pablo Neruda did with his Odes to Common Things, a book which still influences poets
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A Writer Learns From Wyeth

Painter Andrew Wyeth’s views on art could hold valuable insights for writers on creating and developing stories.

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Reflections by Tillie Olsen

"What matters to me is the kind of soil in which people have, out of which they have to grow, and the kind of climate around them." Prose editor DeWitt Henry shares his highlights from a transcribed recording of Tillie Olsen's reading at Emerson College in 1974.

The Story Teller and the Telling

"For my ninth birthday I received my first diary. The first words I wrote: 'I want to be a writer.' This was the first time I articulated what I must have always known. It was always about words—and story—for me."

The Minefield and the Soul

"I do believe an author’s biographical identity is an insufficient marker for experience—even impossible to pin down with any accuracy—and the same holds true for a reader’s. This is the beginning of compassion for others."

On Fact and Fiction

"We don’t have to bullfight to write believably about bullfighting, or love, or crime, or suicide." DeWitt Henry on the lines writers blur between fact and fiction.

Clean

Beth Kephart learns "the liability of having, the politics of possession, the sound of time crashing time, the ache of what is loved and what will be lost."

Words That Don’t Exist

DeWitt Henry on the challenge of balancing author tone with character tone, and the difficulties that arise as far down as word choice.

WTP Writer: John Skoyles

John Skoyles writes between genres, from poetry to prose to nonfiction. He talks his most recent publication The Nut File, excerpted in WTP.